Introduction: Plastics are derived and manufactured from higher density hydrocarbons. They are tough and are not degradable when disposed, potentially present in an ecosystem for between 500 – 1,000 years! With increases in human population and commercial activities over the last century, we have also witnessed a tremendous increase in the quantity and use of plastics as shopping and gift bags, carriers for drinks and water, insulation materials and general packaging of merchandise. In Nigeria however, the most environmentally damaging and unsustainable use of plastics is in the commercial sector where plastics are used as wrapping/shopping bags and as carriers for water in this case commonly known as pure/sachet water. UNEP (2017). Global plastics data. Many bags drift into the ocean, strangling turtles, suffocating seabirds and filling the stomachs of dolphins and whales with waste until they die of starvation. Habib El-Habr, an expert on marine litter working with the UN Environment Programme in Kenya, outraged by the development commented as follows: “If we continue like this, by 2050, we will have more plastic in the ocean than fish.” What are the issues?: The indiscriminate and poor disposal of such used plastics are fraught with numerous environmental consequences which include;…
Who can better manage the forest than those living in it? Community forest contributes to the sustainable livelihoods of millions of rural people living in developing nations. Thus community involvement has the potential to improve the effectiveness, efficiency and provide more co-benefits from REDD+ project. The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF), through support from the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) and Global Environment Facility, Small Grant Programme (GEF- SGP) is re-defining forest management, conservation of landscape and rural livelihoods in selected forest-edge communities (Ebok, Kabakken and Ebranta) in Boje, Boki Local Government Area of Cross Rivers Sate. In 2017, NCF, with the support of GEF-SGP set up the Community-Based REDD+ programme (CBR+) to promote activities that boost poverty eradication, promotion of improved crop varieties and yields, gender empowerment, biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation and adaptation. Through this funding, Ebok, Kabakken and Ebranta communities cultivated two acres of land respectively with improved cassava stem cuttings, set-up cassava processing mills, cultivation and domestication of Afang Gnetum africanum by community members and harvesting of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) - bush mango Irvingia gabonensis as part of efforts to reduce forest loss through improved agricultural practices. Proceeds of the harvest were shared…
The global celebration of forests provides an opportunity to raise awareness of the importance of all types of woodlands and trees, and celebrate the ways in which they sustain and protect us. In Nigeria, less than 5% of the total land area is afforested, yet, even the sparse forest remainders are under threat with land use pressures (agriculture, infrastructure, housing and resources-harvesting) a critical driver of deforestation. Unfortunately, there is an under-appreciation of forests by governments at all level in Nigeria not just for their important ecosystem functions but even for human survival and sustainability as carbon sinks and oxygen pool, together with the numerous other benefits they offer. Key Messages for the society: Forests and trees store carbon, which helps mitigate the impacts of climate change in and around urban areas. Trees also improve the local climate, helping to save energy used for heating by 20-50%. Strategic placement of trees in urban areas can cool the air by up to 8 degrees Celsius, reducing air conditioning needs by 30%. Urban trees are excellent air filters, removing harmful pollutants in the air and fine particulates. Trees reduce noise pollution, as they shield homes from nearby roads and industrial areas. Local…
The Lekki Bird Club (LBC) will be visiting the Lekki Conservation Centre, Lekki,Lagos for the next Expedition on Saturday, the 24th of March, 2018. Please note that Rendezvous will be one location; Lekki Conservation Center (LCC) rendezvous by 6:15 am prompt. Interested individuals should sign up by sending their names. (Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. GSM: +2347085029952) Don't Miss it!
The plan to annually celebrate the World Wildlife Day was conceived during the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly in December, 1983 as a means to raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora as well as to recognise the importance of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in ensuring that international trade of Wild Flora and Fauna does not threaten the survival of species. The theme of World Wildlife Day 2018 ‘Big cats - predators under threat’ is a step further from last year’s theme ‘‘Listen to the Young Voices’ as a way to ensure the realisation of CITES objective in the 182 member states of the United Nations, on the need to urgently rise to the demands of conserving all form of wildlife especially the big predators - who are now globally threatened - with their condition in Nigeria even more dire! With reference to the 2016’s World Environment Day, Amina Mohammed, who until her recent UN’s appointment was the Minister of Environment said, “The status of wildlife in the country leaves much to be desired, as the rate of depletion of the population of animals like the elephants, leopards, giraffes and…
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